home header image - Home
Growing. Sharing. Learning.
Created to educate, unite, and support
commercial cut flower growers.
home slide 2 - Home
Growing. Sharing. Learning.
Created to educate, unite, and support
commercial cut flower growers.
home slide 3 - Home
Growing. Sharing. Learning.
Created to educate, unite, and support
commercial cut flower growers.
previous arrow
next arrow
Slider

Educate. Unite. Support.

The ASCFG was created to educate, unite, and support commercial cut flower growers. It does this by providing production and marketing information; connecting members through events and communications; supporting floriculture research; and encouraging the purchase and use of locally grown flowers by the public. Its mission is to help growers produce high-quality floral material, and to foster and promote the local availability of that product.

Find Local Flowers

Find high quality, locally-grown flowers, foliage, branches, and much more! Discover florists and designers using specialty cut flowers.

What’s New

ASCFG in 2020

ASCFG in 2020

Back to Basics for Cut Flower Nerds
February 18-19, 2020
The Hotel at Oberlin
Oberlin, Ohio

ASCFG Conference and Trade Show
November 9-11, 2020
The Reunion Resort
Orlando, Florida

Notice of Request for Proposals

Notice of Request for Proposals

The ASCFG seeks to expand and improve its existing education program to meet members’ needs for online and in-person education in growing, harvesting, and marketing cut flowers, as well managing cut flower businesses for profit and sustainability. The first phase is a three-month planning contract, the outcome of which should be a detailed program plan, including implementation hiring, funding, and evaluation. The contractor should consider the roles of partners in funding and executing this work.

A companion RFP addresses our research program. You are welcome to apply for either or both.

Slow flower growers stand united across states

Slow flower growers stand united across states

A six percent rise in wholesale value, eight percent more producers, and an increase of 12 percent in acreage. The report card for U.S. floriculture is looking pretty good, when comparing 2018 to the situation three years earlier (see the Floriculture Crops 2018 Summary from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service). So things are looking up for growers in the U.S., but will it remain that way? And what are the challenges and opportunities the industry can expect to see in the near future?

Ask An Expert

Ask An Expert

What are you doing the second Monday of each month? Spend an hour with ASCFG’s flower-growing experts on our Facebook live events! Interact with Bailey Hale, Ardelia Farm & Co., about sweet pea production on February 10.